A Guide to Mobile Messaging For Utility Apps By Stefan Bhagwandin

utility appsSource: Freepik

Utility apps are among the most popular app categories, but they’re probably not the first category that comes to mind when you think about mobile marketing. Many utility apps (such as alarms, file explorers, and notepads) are developed by individuals and small companies. These developers usually don’t have a full marketing team at their disposal, so they rarely send out targeted messaging campaigns.

Even though utility apps exist to solve practical problems, they can still add value and lift engagement through marketing. Their value propositions might be a bit different from a retail or media app’s, but the fundamentals are the same. There’s always some way for an app to leverage mobile messaging campaigns.

To get started, we’ve compiled a few simple campaign ideas for utility apps. Try one of these messaging campaigns to see if it helps your user engagement.

1. Timely Reminders for System Performance Apps

mobile utility app

Source: iTunes

Performance apps are a common type of utility app, and for good reason. They help users make the most of their device’s hardware. Usually these apps are specific to each platform — examples include Battery Life Magic for iOS and SD Maid for Android.

Every performance app works a little bit differently, but the general idea is the same. Utility apps accomplish tasks like:

  • Conserving battery life by closing inactive processes
  • Saving space by deleting app caches and other unnecessary data
  • Freeing up RAM when the user is playing a game, enabling a smoother experience

Usually, system performance apps are set-it-and-forget-it. They operate in the background and don’t require much user input. But unless the app is monetized through paid subscriptions, the app team must still find a way to keep users engaged.

Reminders, delivered via push notification or email, are one way for performance apps to remain top-of-mind. Some actions, like clearing app caches, can be performed at whatever interval the user deems necessary. Some will happily let the app automatically delete old caches once a week, while others will want more control over the process. For users who don’t schedule their actions, the app could send a reminder after a few weeks to suggest a full scan.

That said, today’s mobile users might be put off by a generic push notification reminder. One way to make the message less spammy and more valuable is to mention details specific to the user’s device. For example, the mobile apps for cell carriers like Verizon and AT&T send a personalized push notification alerting users when they’re almost out of data. These messages tell each user the exact amount of data remaining. Personalized messages are 4x more likely to be opened, and they’ll make sure users understand how the app is adding value.

2. Geolocation Alerts for Weather Apps

weather apps

Source: Freepik

There are a few common use cases for push notifications that weather apps have already implemented. It’s easy to receive alerts for extreme weather conditions and surprise rain or snow.

Some apps implement personalization by asking you how you feel on different days. Over time, the app could learn that 60F is chilly for one person but mild for another. But weather apps can personalize even further with geolocation.

Geolocation targeting enables messages that are personalized to each recipient’s physical location. Even if users input their city when they download the app, geolocation enables precise targeting based on the device’s GPS data. This lets the app see not just the person’s city, but their neighborhood or street as well.

Weather apps like Weather Underground and Sunshine can provide the option to send push notifications only when the user isn’t at home. Weather apps can selectively alert users who’re in outdoor areas about mild adverse conditions, like upcoming rain or snow. People who live in rainy areas probably won’t want an alert for every single rainfall, but the message could come in handy if they’re at a park or outdoor venue. Likewise, it may be helpful to alert users when the rain is about to stop so that stranded travelers can plan their escape around gaps in the storm.

Alternatively, apps could let users input their home/work addresses and create a small geofence around them. The app could provide the option to turn off push notifications within these geofences. This way, users who don’t want too many push notifications will still receive weather alerts whenever they’re out.

3. Email Summaries for To-Do Apps

push notification ideas

Source: Freepik

Task management is a huge category for everyday consumers. Apps like Evernote, Wunderlist, and Todoist have dominated the App Store for years. They help you stay organized and productive.

To-do apps can easily send reminders for upcoming tasks, and many of them already do. A more interesting (and under-utilized) use case is sending task summaries to remind users of their accomplishments.

Once a week, a to-do app can email users with key metrics on their app usage. The email could list completed tasks, sort tasks by category, display a pie graph of completed versus pending tasks, and more. Some of these metrics might not be necessary, but they’re a fun way for users to visualize the impact of their actions. It’s motivating to see your work translated into a business report, even if you only use to-do apps to manage groceries and chores.

This messaging campaign might not earn the highest click-through rate, but it’s perfect for encouraging long-term retention and user love. By providing automated insight on user activity, you’re helping each person on their journey toward organizing their lives. If users regularly engage with your weekly reports, they’ll have more reason to stick with your app in the long run, even if a competitor offers similar features.

For another example, a reminder app can track task completion streaks to keep users motivated. Let’s say someone sets up a daily reminder to floss. The app could send messages like “you can do this!” in the morning and “did you remember?” at night. It also tracks your current streak whenever it sends a recurring reminder. Below is an example from Coach.me.

push notification example

In these use cases, mobile marketers can leverage user data not just by quietly using it to inform campaigns, but by openly sharing it with users to add value. Over time, this historical user data becomes a competitive advantage — people will be less inclined to switch to a competitor if they can’t bring their task history with them.

4. New Feature Announcements for Insurance Apps

insurance apps

Source: Freepik

It’s hard to develop new app features, but sometimes it’s even harder to drive customers to those features. This is especially true for apps that deal with complicated topics like insurance. Unlike some types of apps, like weather or reminders, users are unlikely to check their insurance details every day. Apps like Humana, Progressive, and Oscar have to go the extra mile to ensure users understand how the app works.

Insurance apps can use a combination of push notifications and in-app messages to alert users about new app features. For users who don’t browse the app very often, push notifications are the perfect channel for these alerts. Mobile teams can deep link users directly to the new feature within the app, ensuring that they engage with the feature right away.

Alternatively, marketers can create a separate segment for people who regularly use the app and create an in-app message just for them. This message can pop up at app launch and deep link users to the new feature. This is a less intrusive way of announcing your new feature to users who don’t necessarily need a push reminder.

Messaging Campaigns for Every App Vertical

Some apps still feel that mobile messaging won’t work with their product, but this is almost never the case. Between push notifications, email, in-app messages, and App Inbox messages, there’s usually a way to lift engagement by reaching out directly to users. Some utility apps do a good job of adding value and selling themselves, but they can earn even more engagement by proactively interacting with users.

With these campaign ideas, you’re armed with enough knowledge to get started. All that remains is the tools. Schedule a demo to find out how Leanplum empowers mobile teams to craft messaging campaigns just like these — and more.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://ift.tt/2zmt1w4

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A Guide to Mobile Messaging For Utility Apps By Stefan Bhagwandin

utility appsSource: Freepik

Utility apps are among the most popular app categories, but they’re probably not the first category that comes to mind when you think about mobile marketing. Many utility apps (such as alarms, file explorers, and notepads) are developed by individuals and small companies. These developers usually don’t have a full marketing team at their disposal, so they rarely send out targeted messaging campaigns.

Even though utility apps exist to solve practical problems, they can still add value and lift engagement through marketing. Their value propositions might be a bit different from a retail or media app’s, but the fundamentals are the same. There’s always some way for an app to leverage mobile messaging campaigns.

To get started, we’ve compiled a few simple campaign ideas for utility apps. Try one of these messaging campaigns to see if it helps your user engagement.

1. Timely Reminders for System Performance Apps

mobile utility app

Source: iTunes

Performance apps are a common type of utility app, and for good reason. They help users make the most of their device’s hardware. Usually these apps are specific to each platform — examples include Battery Life Magic for iOS and SD Maid for Android.

Every performance app works a little bit differently, but the general idea is the same. Utility apps accomplish tasks like:

  • Conserving battery life by closing inactive processes
  • Saving space by deleting app caches and other unnecessary data
  • Freeing up RAM when the user is playing a game, enabling a smoother experience

Usually, system performance apps are set-it-and-forget-it. They operate in the background and don’t require much user input. But unless the app is monetized through paid subscriptions, the app team must still find a way to keep users engaged.

Reminders, delivered via push notification or email, are one way for performance apps to remain top-of-mind. Some actions, like clearing app caches, can be performed at whatever interval the user deems necessary. Some will happily let the app automatically delete old caches once a week, while others will want more control over the process. For users who don’t schedule their actions, the app could send a reminder after a few weeks to suggest a full scan.

That said, today’s mobile users might be put off by a generic push notification reminder. One way to make the message less spammy and more valuable is to mention details specific to the user’s device. For example, the mobile apps for cell carriers like Verizon and AT&T send a personalized push notification alerting users when they’re almost out of data. These messages tell each user the exact amount of data remaining. Personalized messages are 4x more likely to be opened, and they’ll make sure users understand how the app is adding value.

2. Geolocation Alerts for Weather Apps

weather apps

Source: Freepik

There are a few common use cases for push notifications that weather apps have already implemented. It’s easy to receive alerts for extreme weather conditions and surprise rain or snow.

Some apps implement personalization by asking you how you feel on different days. Over time, the app could learn that 60F is chilly for one person but mild for another. But weather apps can personalize even further with geolocation.

Geolocation targeting enables messages that are personalized to each recipient’s physical location. Even if users input their city when they download the app, geolocation enables precise targeting based on the device’s GPS data. This lets the app see not just the person’s city, but their neighborhood or street as well.

Weather apps like Weather Underground and Sunshine can provide the option to send push notifications only when the user isn’t at home. Weather apps can selectively alert users who’re in outdoor areas about mild adverse conditions, like upcoming rain or snow. People who live in rainy areas probably won’t want an alert for every single rainfall, but the message could come in handy if they’re at a park or outdoor venue. Likewise, it may be helpful to alert users when the rain is about to stop so that stranded travelers can plan their escape around gaps in the storm.

Alternatively, apps could let users input their home/work addresses and create a small geofence around them. The app could provide the option to turn off push notifications within these geofences. This way, users who don’t want too many push notifications will still receive weather alerts whenever they’re out.

3. Email Summaries for To-Do Apps

push notification ideas

Source: Freepik

Task management is a huge category for everyday consumers. Apps like Evernote, Wunderlist, and Todoist have dominated the App Store for years. They help you stay organized and productive.

To-do apps can easily send reminders for upcoming tasks, and many of them already do. A more interesting (and under-utilized) use case is sending task summaries to remind users of their accomplishments.

Once a week, a to-do app can email users with key metrics on their app usage. The email could list completed tasks, sort tasks by category, display a pie graph of completed versus pending tasks, and more. Some of these metrics might not be necessary, but they’re a fun way for users to visualize the impact of their actions. It’s motivating to see your work translated into a business report, even if you only use to-do apps to manage groceries and chores.

This messaging campaign might not earn the highest click-through rate, but it’s perfect for encouraging long-term retention and user love. By providing automated insight on user activity, you’re helping each person on their journey toward organizing their lives. If users regularly engage with your weekly reports, they’ll have more reason to stick with your app in the long run, even if a competitor offers similar features.

For another example, a reminder app can track task completion streaks to keep users motivated. Let’s say someone sets up a daily reminder to floss. The app could send messages like “you can do this!” in the morning and “did you remember?” at night. It also tracks your current streak whenever it sends a recurring reminder. Below is an example from Coach.me.

push notification example

In these use cases, mobile marketers can leverage user data not just by quietly using it to inform campaigns, but by openly sharing it with users to add value. Over time, this historical user data becomes a competitive advantage — people will be less inclined to switch to a competitor if they can’t bring their task history with them.

4. New Feature Announcements for Insurance Apps

insurance apps

Source: Freepik

It’s hard to develop new app features, but sometimes it’s even harder to drive customers to those features. This is especially true for apps that deal with complicated topics like insurance. Unlike some types of apps, like weather or reminders, users are unlikely to check their insurance details every day. Apps like Humana, Progressive, and Oscar have to go the extra mile to ensure users understand how the app works.

Insurance apps can use a combination of push notifications and in-app messages to alert users about new app features. For users who don’t browse the app very often, push notifications are the perfect channel for these alerts. Mobile teams can deep link users directly to the new feature within the app, ensuring that they engage with the feature right away.

Alternatively, marketers can create a separate segment for people who regularly use the app and create an in-app message just for them. This message can pop up at app launch and deep link users to the new feature. This is a less intrusive way of announcing your new feature to users who don’t necessarily need a push reminder.

Messaging Campaigns for Every App Vertical

Some apps still feel that mobile messaging won’t work with their product, but this is almost never the case. Between push notifications, email, in-app messages, and App Inbox messages, there’s usually a way to lift engagement by reaching out directly to users. Some utility apps do a good job of adding value and selling themselves, but they can earn even more engagement by proactively interacting with users.

With these campaign ideas, you’re armed with enough knowledge to get started. All that remains is the tools. Schedule a demo to find out how Leanplum empowers mobile teams to craft messaging campaigns just like these — and more.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://ift.tt/2zmt1w4

A Guide to Mobile Messaging For Utility Apps By Stefan Bhagwandin

utility appsSource: Freepik

Utility apps are among the most popular app categories, but they’re probably not the first category that comes to mind when you think about mobile marketing. Many utility apps (such as alarms, file explorers, and notepads) are developed by individuals and small companies. These developers usually don’t have a full marketing team at their disposal, so they rarely send out targeted messaging campaigns.

Even though utility apps exist to solve practical problems, they can still add value and lift engagement through marketing. Their value propositions might be a bit different from a retail or media app’s, but the fundamentals are the same. There’s always some way for an app to leverage mobile messaging campaigns.

To get started, we’ve compiled a few simple campaign ideas for utility apps. Try one of these messaging campaigns to see if it helps your user engagement.

1. Timely Reminders for System Performance Apps

mobile utility app

Source: iTunes

Performance apps are a common type of utility app, and for good reason. They help users make the most of their device’s hardware. Usually these apps are specific to each platform — examples include Battery Life Magic for iOS and SD Maid for Android.

Every performance app works a little bit differently, but the general idea is the same. Utility apps accomplish tasks like:

  • Conserving battery life by closing inactive processes
  • Saving space by deleting app caches and other unnecessary data
  • Freeing up RAM when the user is playing a game, enabling a smoother experience

Usually, system performance apps are set-it-and-forget-it. They operate in the background and don’t require much user input. But unless the app is monetized through paid subscriptions, the app team must still find a way to keep users engaged.

Reminders, delivered via push notification or email, are one way for performance apps to remain top-of-mind. Some actions, like clearing app caches, can be performed at whatever interval the user deems necessary. Some will happily let the app automatically delete old caches once a week, while others will want more control over the process. For users who don’t schedule their actions, the app could send a reminder after a few weeks to suggest a full scan.

That said, today’s mobile users might be put off by a generic push notification reminder. One way to make the message less spammy and more valuable is to mention details specific to the user’s device. For example, the mobile apps for cell carriers like Verizon and AT&T send a personalized push notification alerting users when they’re almost out of data. These messages tell each user the exact amount of data remaining. Personalized messages are 4x more likely to be opened, and they’ll make sure users understand how the app is adding value.

2. Geolocation Alerts for Weather Apps

weather apps

Source: Freepik

There are a few common use cases for push notifications that weather apps have already implemented. It’s easy to receive alerts for extreme weather conditions and surprise rain or snow.

Some apps implement personalization by asking you how you feel on different days. Over time, the app could learn that 60F is chilly for one person but mild for another. But weather apps can personalize even further with geolocation.

Geolocation targeting enables messages that are personalized to each recipient’s physical location. Even if users input their city when they download the app, geolocation enables precise targeting based on the device’s GPS data. This lets the app see not just the person’s city, but their neighborhood or street as well.

Weather apps like Weather Underground and Sunshine can provide the option to send push notifications only when the user isn’t at home. Weather apps can selectively alert users who’re in outdoor areas about mild adverse conditions, like upcoming rain or snow. People who live in rainy areas probably won’t want an alert for every single rainfall, but the message could come in handy if they’re at a park or outdoor venue. Likewise, it may be helpful to alert users when the rain is about to stop so that stranded travelers can plan their escape around gaps in the storm.

Alternatively, apps could let users input their home/work addresses and create a small geofence around them. The app could provide the option to turn off push notifications within these geofences. This way, users who don’t want too many push notifications will still receive weather alerts whenever they’re out.

3. Email Summaries for To-Do Apps

push notification ideas

Source: Freepik

Task management is a huge category for everyday consumers. Apps like Evernote, Wunderlist, and Todoist have dominated the App Store for years. They help you stay organized and productive.

To-do apps can easily send reminders for upcoming tasks, and many of them already do. A more interesting (and under-utilized) use case is sending task summaries to remind users of their accomplishments.

Once a week, a to-do app can email users with key metrics on their app usage. The email could list completed tasks, sort tasks by category, display a pie graph of completed versus pending tasks, and more. Some of these metrics might not be necessary, but they’re a fun way for users to visualize the impact of their actions. It’s motivating to see your work translated into a business report, even if you only use to-do apps to manage groceries and chores.

This messaging campaign might not earn the highest click-through rate, but it’s perfect for encouraging long-term retention and user love. By providing automated insight on user activity, you’re helping each person on their journey toward organizing their lives. If users regularly engage with your weekly reports, they’ll have more reason to stick with your app in the long run, even if a competitor offers similar features.

For another example, a reminder app can track task completion streaks to keep users motivated. Let’s say someone sets up a daily reminder to floss. The app could send messages like “you can do this!” in the morning and “did you remember?” at night. It also tracks your current streak whenever it sends a recurring reminder. Below is an example from Coach.me.

push notification example

In these use cases, mobile marketers can leverage user data not just by quietly using it to inform campaigns, but by openly sharing it with users to add value. Over time, this historical user data becomes a competitive advantage — people will be less inclined to switch to a competitor if they can’t bring their task history with them.

4. New Feature Announcements for Insurance Apps

insurance apps

Source: Freepik

It’s hard to develop new app features, but sometimes it’s even harder to drive customers to those features. This is especially true for apps that deal with complicated topics like insurance. Unlike some types of apps, like weather or reminders, users are unlikely to check their insurance details every day. Apps like Humana, Progressive, and Oscar have to go the extra mile to ensure users understand how the app works.

Insurance apps can use a combination of push notifications and in-app messages to alert users about new app features. For users who don’t browse the app very often, push notifications are the perfect channel for these alerts. Mobile teams can deep link users directly to the new feature within the app, ensuring that they engage with the feature right away.

Alternatively, marketers can create a separate segment for people who regularly use the app and create an in-app message just for them. This message can pop up at app launch and deep link users to the new feature. This is a less intrusive way of announcing your new feature to users who don’t necessarily need a push reminder.

Messaging Campaigns for Every App Vertical

Some apps still feel that mobile messaging won’t work with their product, but this is almost never the case. Between push notifications, email, in-app messages, and App Inbox messages, there’s usually a way to lift engagement by reaching out directly to users. Some utility apps do a good job of adding value and selling themselves, but they can earn even more engagement by proactively interacting with users.

With these campaign ideas, you’re armed with enough knowledge to get started. All that remains is the tools. Schedule a demo to find out how Leanplum empowers mobile teams to craft messaging campaigns just like these — and more.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://ift.tt/2zmt1w4

A Guide to Mobile Messaging For Utility Apps By Stefan Bhagwandin

utility appsSource: Freepik

Utility apps are among the most popular app categories, but they’re probably not the first category that comes to mind when you think about mobile marketing. Many utility apps (such as alarms, file explorers, and notepads) are developed by individuals and small companies. These developers usually don’t have a full marketing team at their disposal, so they rarely send out targeted messaging campaigns.

Even though utility apps exist to solve practical problems, they can still add value and lift engagement through marketing. Their value propositions might be a bit different from a retail or media app’s, but the fundamentals are the same. There’s always some way for an app to leverage mobile messaging campaigns.

To get started, we’ve compiled a few simple campaign ideas for utility apps. Try one of these messaging campaigns to see if it helps your user engagement.

1. Timely Reminders for System Performance Apps

mobile utility app

Source: iTunes

Performance apps are a common type of utility app, and for good reason. They help users make the most of their device’s hardware. Usually these apps are specific to each platform — examples include Battery Life Magic for iOS and SD Maid for Android.

Every performance app works a little bit differently, but the general idea is the same. Utility apps accomplish tasks like:

  • Conserving battery life by closing inactive processes
  • Saving space by deleting app caches and other unnecessary data
  • Freeing up RAM when the user is playing a game, enabling a smoother experience

Usually, system performance apps are set-it-and-forget-it. They operate in the background and don’t require much user input. But unless the app is monetized through paid subscriptions, the app team must still find a way to keep users engaged.

Reminders, delivered via push notification or email, are one way for performance apps to remain top-of-mind. Some actions, like clearing app caches, can be performed at whatever interval the user deems necessary. Some will happily let the app automatically delete old caches once a week, while others will want more control over the process. For users who don’t schedule their actions, the app could send a reminder after a few weeks to suggest a full scan.

That said, today’s mobile users might be put off by a generic push notification reminder. One way to make the message less spammy and more valuable is to mention details specific to the user’s device. For example, the mobile apps for cell carriers like Verizon and AT&T send a personalized push notification alerting users when they’re almost out of data. These messages tell each user the exact amount of data remaining. Personalized messages are 4x more likely to be opened, and they’ll make sure users understand how the app is adding value.

2. Geolocation Alerts for Weather Apps

weather apps

Source: Freepik

There are a few common use cases for push notifications that weather apps have already implemented. It’s easy to receive alerts for extreme weather conditions and surprise rain or snow.

Some apps implement personalization by asking you how you feel on different days. Over time, the app could learn that 60F is chilly for one person but mild for another. But weather apps can personalize even further with geolocation.

Geolocation targeting enables messages that are personalized to each recipient’s physical location. Even if users input their city when they download the app, geolocation enables precise targeting based on the device’s GPS data. This lets the app see not just the person’s city, but their neighborhood or street as well.

Weather apps like Weather Underground and Sunshine can provide the option to send push notifications only when the user isn’t at home. Weather apps can selectively alert users who’re in outdoor areas about mild adverse conditions, like upcoming rain or snow. People who live in rainy areas probably won’t want an alert for every single rainfall, but the message could come in handy if they’re at a park or outdoor venue. Likewise, it may be helpful to alert users when the rain is about to stop so that stranded travelers can plan their escape around gaps in the storm.

Alternatively, apps could let users input their home/work addresses and create a small geofence around them. The app could provide the option to turn off push notifications within these geofences. This way, users who don’t want too many push notifications will still receive weather alerts whenever they’re out.

3. Email Summaries for To-Do Apps

push notification ideas

Source: Freepik

Task management is a huge category for everyday consumers. Apps like Evernote, Wunderlist, and Todoist have dominated the App Store for years. They help you stay organized and productive.

To-do apps can easily send reminders for upcoming tasks, and many of them already do. A more interesting (and under-utilized) use case is sending task summaries to remind users of their accomplishments.

Once a week, a to-do app can email users with key metrics on their app usage. The email could list completed tasks, sort tasks by category, display a pie graph of completed versus pending tasks, and more. Some of these metrics might not be necessary, but they’re a fun way for users to visualize the impact of their actions. It’s motivating to see your work translated into a business report, even if you only use to-do apps to manage groceries and chores.

This messaging campaign might not earn the highest click-through rate, but it’s perfect for encouraging long-term retention and user love. By providing automated insight on user activity, you’re helping each person on their journey toward organizing their lives. If users regularly engage with your weekly reports, they’ll have more reason to stick with your app in the long run, even if a competitor offers similar features.

For another example, a reminder app can track task completion streaks to keep users motivated. Let’s say someone sets up a daily reminder to floss. The app could send messages like “you can do this!” in the morning and “did you remember?” at night. It also tracks your current streak whenever it sends a recurring reminder. Below is an example from Coach.me.

push notification example

In these use cases, mobile marketers can leverage user data not just by quietly using it to inform campaigns, but by openly sharing it with users to add value. Over time, this historical user data becomes a competitive advantage — people will be less inclined to switch to a competitor if they can’t bring their task history with them.

4. New Feature Announcements for Insurance Apps

insurance apps

Source: Freepik

It’s hard to develop new app features, but sometimes it’s even harder to drive customers to those features. This is especially true for apps that deal with complicated topics like insurance. Unlike some types of apps, like weather or reminders, users are unlikely to check their insurance details every day. Apps like Humana, Progressive, and Oscar have to go the extra mile to ensure users understand how the app works.

Insurance apps can use a combination of push notifications and in-app messages to alert users about new app features. For users who don’t browse the app very often, push notifications are the perfect channel for these alerts. Mobile teams can deep link users directly to the new feature within the app, ensuring that they engage with the feature right away.

Alternatively, marketers can create a separate segment for people who regularly use the app and create an in-app message just for them. This message can pop up at app launch and deep link users to the new feature. This is a less intrusive way of announcing your new feature to users who don’t necessarily need a push reminder.

Messaging Campaigns for Every App Vertical

Some apps still feel that mobile messaging won’t work with their product, but this is almost never the case. Between push notifications, email, in-app messages, and App Inbox messages, there’s usually a way to lift engagement by reaching out directly to users. Some utility apps do a good job of adding value and selling themselves, but they can earn even more engagement by proactively interacting with users.

With these campaign ideas, you’re armed with enough knowledge to get started. All that remains is the tools. Schedule a demo to find out how Leanplum empowers mobile teams to craft messaging campaigns just like these — and more.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://ift.tt/2zmt1w4

5 Ways to Protect Your Business Tech Tools By Amanda Abella

I recently had an accident with one of my business tech tools. I was working away on my MacBook when I accidentally spilled a glass of water on it. Needless to say, it’s fried.

Because I didn’t have Apple Care (I never use it), there was nothing that could be done. Heck, even with Apple Care, by the time I would have gotten my Macbook to the store it probably would have been too late for the battery and hard drive.

Bottom line is I had to buy a whole new MacBook. Fortunately, I have the savings for such a blow. However, this has gotten me thinking about the ways we can better protect our business tech tools.

Pay with credit card.

I know there are a lot of people out there who are anti credit card for various reasons. I’m not one of them.

One of the reasons why I love credit cards is because you can use them to protect your business tech tools. More specifically, if you pay for your business tech tools with your credit card, some cards automatically give you an extended warranty on your purchase.

Sign up for stuff like Apple Care (if you really feel like you need it).

So here’s the thing. I don’t usually spring for stuff like Apple Care. In the six and a half years I’ve had Apple products, there’s only one time I would have had to use them. During that one time, I was pretty much self-insured with enough cash in the bank to replace my computer.

That being said, I know not everyone is willing to take that kind of risk. So, if you know you tend to get into trouble with your business tech tools, then do sign up for something like Apple Care.

Know where to go to get your stuff fixed.

While you may think you need to go to a specific place to get your business tech tools fixed, there are more cost-effective options out there.

When I broke the screen to my iPhone, I went to a local shop that fixes phones. My phone was as good as new in an hour and I didn’t have to spend a lot of money on insurance or getting a replacement. In fact, that insurance would have cost more than just getting it fixed.

Periodically change your passwords.

Your business tech tools should always be password protected. Additionally, you should be changing that password every few months to ensure no one catches on as to what it is.

After all, protecting your tech tools isn’t just about making sure they don’t break. Protection also looks like making sure they don’t get hacked.

Invest in preventative protection.

In addition to investing in things that will help fix your business tech, you should also invest in things that keep them from breaking in the first place. This includes protective screens, cases and keyboard covers.

Final Thoughts

Business tech tools are not cheap, therefore we should find ways to protect them. After all, we need these things in order to keep working and make money.

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3 Good Reasons Why Your Small Business Needs a Mobile App By Megan Ritter

It wasn’t so long ago that many small businesses were neglecting having their own website. Now that the benefit to that is clear, there are still some slow to adopt having a mobile app strategy.

While it can be very difficult for every small business to adapt to every new change as it comes, when you learn just why more and more businesses are investing the time and money into creating their mobile apps, you’ll want to join them. Here are three important reasons why your business needs its own mobile app.

JESHOOTS / Pixabay

1. Your Customers Are Mobile All the Time

Not every business can be like 7-Eleven, open 24 hours a day with the lights always on. Many also cannot afford to staff someone at all times of the day to answer calls and speak with customers.

A mobile app can handle this for you in a number of ways. First of all, Americans check their phones more than 8 billion times per day according to an article in Times magazine. By interacting with your customers where they essentially live, you increase the chances of them having a new transaction with your business at any given time.

2. Increase Customer Loyalty by Reaching Your Best Customers

If your customers feel confident enough in your business to install your app, they’re committing an interest in dealing with you. A mobile app install can be just as effective if not more so than having a phone or email lead to your business.

Ever gotten a ping on your phone that you checked and realized it was from an app? That was a push notification. Push notifications allow customers to opt-in to receive information on new deals, order tracking, and more from the apps they use. By taking advantage of this same space, you have the best advertising real estate you could ever ask for with your target customers.

3. Having a Mobile App Increases Brand Awareness and Perception

We’re still in a time where it’s not out of the ordinary for every business not to have an app. It’s often convenient when they do, but it has the perception of a high value-added service. Many of your competitors may still be slow to adopt this practice, and your customers will appreciate your progressive approach in your industry.

It’s nowhere near as expensive to get a properly working app developed for Android and iOS as you might anticipate.

Having a mobile app is very cost-effective, and when you see all the options it gives you in dealing with your customers, you’re going to be wondering why you waited so long.

As a small business owner, keeping up to date with new marketing strategies is important. It may be difficult to take advantage of every new tactic that becomes available, however, when one can be implemented this easily and has this many benefits, you definitely need to evaluate it for your own strategy. If you decide to use a mobile app to make interaction with your business more convenient, your customers will thank you for it.

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App Engagement – The Ultimate Guide To Boost Retention And Engagement By James Ewen

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Improve user retention, boost app engagement metrics and improve your bottom line.

Simply put – mobile app engagement is providing your users with a reason to keep coming back to your mobile app or open your mobile app and perform the desired action.

You must create an engagement strategy that boasts high-quality communication.

As well as this you must use the data, analytics, and insights from your users to help you to learn which part of your app engagement strategy is working the best.

App engagement is all about putting the user needs first. There’s no quick fix. It involves defining your key app KPIs. Then creating an app communication strategy that is relevant to your mobile audience.

What are the most common mobile app engagement metrics and KPIs?

If you’re looking at how to improve your mobile app engagement then you’ll be looking at improving these specific mobile application metrics.

  • Active users
  • Retention rate
  • Session length
  • Screen views per visit

In general, the more time your active users spend in your app and the more screens that they interact with, the more engaged your mobile users are.

That’s why focusing on experience, rather than just individual features is key. Let’s look at how you can increase these key app metrics.

Push notifications

Push notifications are one of the most effective ways to engage your app users. But, if misused, they are one of the quickest methods to app deletion. The truth is that many mobile apps seeking to engage their users to fall into the second category.

So how often should you send push notifications to your users?

With push notifications, it’s about providing the most value to your app audience. If your mobile users are getting value from your app then they are going to be more engaged.

That sounds obvious, yet so many app engagement strategies fail to take it into consideration. There are so many push notification services that claim that quantity is key to boosting engagement. But, this will very quickly have a negative effect if you don’t consider personalization and relevancy in your push notification strategy.

It’s also important to understand push notification statistics when trying to engage your audience.

So, let’s look at how you can engage your mobile app users by building a push notification strategy.

Only send push notifications when it’s relevant to do so

If you look at your phone right now, you’ll probably see a huge list of notifications sitting there, unanswered. Never swiped and hardly even read. If you want to engage your mobile app users you need to create a positive impression of your app in the minds of your users.

Spamming your users with push notifications isn’t the way to engage your users. You need your users to enjoy reading that notification when it comes. You need to provide them with value.

Content is key

The first step is really thinking about the content. Just because it’s the latest app feature your team created, doesn’t mean that your app users will engage with countless notifications about it.

You need to think like an app user. What do app users engage with? What do you, as an app user engage with most? Which apps on your phone are doing this best? If you can think like your users then you’ll start to get on track with your app engagement strategy.

This involves clearly defining the instance in which your mobile audience wants you to speak to them. This may involve in-app analytics and feedback, but we’ll get onto that in good time, don’t worry.

If you have a recipe app, for example. Why would you send them notifications when they are in the bank. Why would you remind them to make dinner at 11 pm at night? Why would you ask them to choose their perfect recipes when they are on holiday?

Highly targeted push notifications can increase response rates by up to 7x and will dramatically increase your app engagement rates.

But how do you control how, when why and what push notifications your mobile app users receive?

Location-based push notifications

That’s right, get yourself a platform or a service that lets you control when your users receive push notifications.

It’s simple – if your users are in highly relevant _moments _ then send them highly relevant communication. That’s it.

Let’s look at the example from above. What a difference it would make to have a recipe app that suggested you make a saved recipe when you were in the store, and lacking recipe inspiration.

That’s what your app was supposed to do, yet you aren’t giving it the change to help users in the right moment.

This is where location comes in. By predefining a number of supermarkets using a simple online platform, you can ensure that push notifications are only delivered at relevant times.

The application applies to all apps looking to implement a successful mobile app engagement strategy. Define the optimal moment for your mobile users to use your app. Send them optimal notifications ONLY in these moments. Improve engagement. Get insights and use this to inform your engagement strategy and fine-tune.

What makes a good push notification?

Let’s look at some examples of good push notifications that will keep your app users engaged.

For this, I’ve imagined some generic apps rather than real ones. Although we’d be happy to give you a specific demo for your own mobile app.

App with a physical location or venue

If your app has a real-world counterpart that was supposed to benefit from your app. Then location-based push is perfect. You probably have a good idea of how your audience uses your products or services.

A good engagement boosting example for this kind of app would be:
restaurant app push notification best practices to engage your mobile audience

Of course in this example, the user receives the notification just as they enter the restaurant.

Stand-alone discovery apps

Okay, so you don’t have a retail store, just an app. That’s fine. You might need to spend some time learning how your users get the most value from your app. But that’s fine, that’s one of the most important aspects of this kind of engagement strategy (again more on that in a short while)

In this example, you’ll need to understand what engages your users best, look at the data and then rinse and repeat. An example:

food lifestyle app push notification best practices for engagement

In this case the micro-moment could be as they are leaving another nightlife venue. Thus avoiding spamming all the users that have decided to spend a Friday night in.

Apps with a specific function

What if your app provides a vital function? Location-based notifications can help to engage users by bringing this function to them at the best possible moment.

taxi app location based push notifications best practice to improve engagement and retention

Here the user would be notified when they land at an airport. Those eagle-eyed amongst you might ask – how would you ensure that the user doesn’t get the notification on outbound part of the trip? Well, triggers can be based on complex location signals, in this case the second time they are seen inside the airport within a certain period.

Some homework (spoiler – it’s much easier with insights)

  • What micro-moment should trigger notification delivery?
  • What is the best way that you can personalize the notification based on this micro-moment?
  • What is the desired goal of the push notification?
  • What are the key engagement KPIs that this campaign should improve?

Re-engaging your mobile app users

One of the most effective ways that apps can improve their user retention rate is to re-engage and retain their mobile app users.

Often many apps neglect the customers that they have spent countless mobile app marketing dollars on acquiring.

After 24 hours an apps retention rate falls to 21%. By day 10 this figure drops to 7.5%. After 90 days, it’s a measly 1.89%.

Therefore a significant increase in retention rate can be the most important strategy for app owners. Rather than placing your entire budget into acquiring new users, you should be focusing on re-engaging your users. Just a small rise in app retention rates can have a huge effect on your bottom line.

Fixing your app on-boarding process

You need to ensure that the basics are in place for you to keep engaging your app audience. This means that your on-boarding process should be seamless, provide value and explain exactly what it is that your app does.

Think of these as the perfect blocks to build your app user experience. The engagement strategy is the cement that fine-tunes it and links it all together.

For a more detailed list of app on-boarding best practices check out this.

Deep linking from push to relevant in-app location

So you crafted the perfect notification. Congratulations. Your users clicked it. And it directed them to…

The app home screen.

Again it seems obvious but many apps get this completely wrong. Choose a push notification service that lets you link to highly relevant app experiences.

They probably exist in your app. So make sure you are improving the mobile app experience by allowing your users to get to it quickly.

If you want to improve app re-engagement then getting your users to notice your app is just the beginning. You’ll want to ensure that your personalised notification takes the user to the right place.

With many location-based push notification services, it’s possible to deep link to the right content based on the user’s current location.

That could be the most recent content to keep delivering your users a fresh experience and keep them engaged.

Think about your app experience

A note on personalization – ultimately your app engagement metrics will improve if you place personalization at the heart of your app engagement strategy.

This means that you need to think of the user at every point in the user journey. If you want to take your app engagement to new heights then you’ll have to personalise the user experience, clearly define your app’s KPIs and learn how your users want to engage with your app.

But that’s only the first part. How do you keep learning what your app users are engaging with and what parts of your strategy in performing best? Well, that leads me nicely onto…

In-app analytics and insights

None of the above will matter if you don’t commit to learning what works best with your users. Every app is different with different app engagement KPIs.

Analyzing your engagement data is key to building an effective app engagement strategy.

Push notifications give you valuable insights around your users. If you want to know how to improve your app user engagement then you need to understand mobile app analytics.

The feedback from your push campaigns helps you to understand what engages your mobile users.

I’m not just talking about the age, time, gender and device type of your users. Although those can sometimes be helpful.

I’m talking about understanding in which micro-moment your users are most likely to engage with your app.

Understand your app’s micro-moments

This is such valuable information. Many apps have an idea of what this moment might be. But often, their idea of what this is is quite different to what the insights say. Data should be everything for your mobile engagement strategy. And it’s time to take this data to the next level.

When you send a push notification to users and you know that your users are opening them in a certain context, this is valuable information.

These insights even go beyond your app engagement. They can help fundamentally to inform everything to do with your app growth strategy. From most important new app features to UX and monetization.

If you know that more of your users are engaging with your notifications in a certain location then you get a better idea of your app audience. You can understand them better, and hypothesize the specifics that will help to improve app engagement.

Location-based insights

In a world with over a million apps, it’s important that you leverage every piece of data that you can around app engagement. You need to make data your best friend if you want to keep developing your app engagement strategy.

If you can get data around your app users that the majority of apps can’t get access to then your onto a winner.

The truth is that many app engagement strategies fail to understand where their users go and how they behave.

Beyond basic engagement insights

For example, you might get feedback around how your users are opening your push notification, using specific in-app features, or even just opening the app.

These insights might be based on time of day, or maybe you can even get a breakdown of this data based on audience type (depending on which service you use).

But what if you could get a better insight into the mind of your user at that time? Basic insights are great, but it doesn’t always paint the perfect picture. You need to get as much data as possible if you are going to keep engaging your app users.

Location insights around app users can help drive mobile app engagement KPIs. If you can understand exactly where your users go and how they behave then you can create a better idea of how to engage them.

Engagement data that retains users

For example, let’s say you have a sports app and you might send a re-engagement notification that performs reasonably well. You look at the data available to you and you see that a sizeable chunk of these notifications were opened between 12-3pm. Now that is a great insight, but what if you could learn more?

If you layer location insights around that data you might see a more useful pattern emerge. You could see that the majority of these notifications are opened in bars, and even more specifically sports bars.

Now you can really begin to hypothesize and fine tune your value proposition. You can see that the majority of your users are using your scores app whilst they are watching a game in a bar or sports venue.

This all links back to your app engagement strategy. You have a better idea of how and where your users get the most value from your mobile app, and this helps you to develop your app engagement strategy.

By understanding your user’s behaviour you are much better placed to say which factors are most likely to boosts your app engagement KPIs.

Make sure you choose the right app engagement platform

Choose a mobile app analytics and communication platform that works for your app. You need a mobile engagement platform that allows you to reach your app users in the best possible moment and understand how your users respond and behave.

Conclusion

  • Think about which app engagement metric is most important to you.
  • Clearly define which aspects of your app engage your users.
  • Place the user first. Think about providing value to your users rather than communicating with them for the sake of it.
  • Use highly personalized notification to engage your users in the best in-app micro-moment.
  • Re-engagement can be the most effective way to improve your app revenue or bottom line.
  • Take a data centric approach to engagement.
  • Always be ready to hypothesize and learn from your engagement data.

Follow these rules and you’ll be well on your way to creating a mobile app engagement strategy that works for your app.

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