6 New Things In iOS 12 That Every Marketer Needs To Know By Ellen Flynn

PhotoMIX-Company / Pixabay

The advent of iOS 12 has made some pretty big waves in the way Apple users will continue to engage with apps on their mobile devices. As more and more apps are downloaded to devices, notifications become the primary way users interact with and communicate with brands. But more often than not, they find themselves sifting through reams of content, trying and failing to separate the notifications they want from the sludge pile.

This is all about to change, however, because with iOS 12 the user is king and with that title comes control. And if you haven’t heard anything about it already, that control could be bad news for bad marketers. More of that here.

In this post, we’re going to take a closer look at what those notification changes are, and what exactly they mean for brands.

Quiet Delivery

Quiet notifications are delivered to Apple’s new notification center, rather than the lock screen, allowing people to go about their business uninterrupted by alerts. Only prominent notifications (ie: those specified by the individual user) will go to the lock screen. This has serious implications for marketers. Most importantly it enables your users to effectively ignore your brand if they are inundated with unimportant, irrelevant messages.

What brands need to ensure is that they are the brand that users want to be interrupted by. So it’s imperative that all messages add value to the customer, and at risk of repeating ourselves, we are back to reminding marketers to make those messages relevant, useful and above all personalized.

Instant Tuning

Instant tuning is a major change for users, enabling them to control their notification settings from within the notification itself, without having to launch the settings app. So, if notifications are irritating (and we know that 84% of users think that notifications are irrelevant) the user can stop receiving, or silence them, right inside the notification.

This gives marketers an extremely slim margin to prove their messages are worth being seen. And more importantly – one, just one, bad notification can undo months of hard work by the brand to build a relationship with their customer, so it’s imperative that brands are on their game 24/7 and for every notification or message they send.

Provisional Authorization

Provisional alerts help your user make an informed decision about allowing notifications. So the user can opt-in to notifications provisionally but these notifications will be delivered quietly, and only show up in the notification center, giving the user time to decide if they want their notifications to be quiet, prominent, or turned off altogether.

As with all the above changes, this puts more power into the users’ hands and means brands have to up their game when it comes to what messages they send to their individual customers.

Grouped Notifications

Up until iOS 11 all incoming notifications were inserted in chronological order in the notification list. However, due to the slew of notifications users receive from multiple apps on their devices, Apple will now automatically group notifications into threads. So, instead of scrolling through endless Instagram or WhatsApp notifications, they will now be grouped.

Brands can capitalize on this one though, and create notification threads and summary text for their groups. This will be very useful for apps specializing in emerging news stories, travel itineraries, or order tracking, allowing the marketers in those areas to showcase useful, and above all relevant messaging.

Dynamic Notifications

Dynamic notifications is perhaps the most exciting change in this release and can be well utilized by marketers. Brands can customize what call-to-actions appear underneath their content, and the user can now complete actions from right inside the notification. The CTA will deep-link the user directly to where the notification advertises, without any hassle.

It’s a much more interactive experience for the user, while also giving real-time feedback for the brand. This is a great development for marketers, but will only be effective if the message is right for the user.

Critical Notifications

A great feature on our devices is ‘Do Not Disturb’ mode. Important meetings and appointments are no longer in danger of being interrupted by tell-tale alert sounds. But what if you received a notification that was important enough to interrupt that meeting? What if it related to your health, safety, or home’s security? These are the types of messages that customers want to see straight away, which is why Apple has brought in critical alerts.

Critical alerts will be delivered with sound and on screen, even when ‘Do Not Disturb’ is enabled. They have a red-warning icon and custom configuration in the app’s settings. And the key to these critical alerts is that they require the user to take action immediately, so it’s imperative that it is used only for very specific apps, sending very specific messages. But don’t worry, these alerts will only apply to app’s that meet apple’s (thankfully) stringent requirements.

Take away

More than ever before iOS 12 means that brands need to ensure that they are delivering high-value messages to their users’ screens. That is, content that is highly relevant, personal, and useful to individual users. As well as that, brands need to begin qualifying the types of messages they send their customers and group them into Apple’s new messaging parameters; critical, prominent or quiet.

For some marketers, these changes may mean a strategy overhaul, but they shouldn’t. All they really require are adopting marketing practices that are good for the customer and good for the brand. Which is nothing new, if you really think about it.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://bit.ly/2Pk1MLs

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Digital Nomads Are Growing Up: Anywhere Workers Define The Future Of The Workforce By Eva Reder

Free-Photos / Pixabay

Digital nomads aren’t just the hippies of 2018. They are actually redefining what it means to be in the workforce.

The term “digital nomad” has been picking up over the last few years. It’s the lifestyle dream of being able to travel the world while getting paid by either freelancing, hopping from gig to gig, or running your own online company. I’ve personally lived on four continents in three years while building my startup before ending up in Silicon Valley.

Still, I never saw myself as a digital nomad. I was simply traveling and working remotely for different startups and living in different cities that I was interested in. I wasn’t really hopping from coffee shop to coffee shop or working from a beach in Bali. And honestly, I don’t think this image is a very realistic outlook for the future of work nor is it the goal for most other young, ambitious millennials. Not everybody is cut out for entrepreneurship nor wants to commit to a 2018 version of the hippy lifestyle. Is it possible that what workers really want is the flexibility and freedom that a digital nomad lifestyle offers while still having all the upsides of having a stable job for a company?

This doesn’t mean we can’t be a valuable part of the workforce or loyal employees, though. The term “digital nomad” just needs a makeover and get redefined.

And that’s exactly what new study by AND CO and Remote Year did, coining the term “Anywhere Workers.” Their study with over 3,700 remote workers gives insight into the new workforce.

Here are some of the most interesting conclusions from it:

Digital Nomads are growing up, and employers are (slowly) adjusting

Remote workers are no longer just self-motivated. Almost a quarter of respondents said their employer’s organization was fully remote. Companies like Invision, Stack Overflow, Toptal, Zapier, and Buffer are leading the way, boasting a fully distributed team. 39.3% of remote workers in the study were employed by global companies.

“The new nomads” are less interested in sipping margaritas on the beach in Bali than you might think. While the ability to combine work and travel is certainly a strong plus for lots of remote workers, most of them work from their home countries. Only 9% of the respondents stated that they chose to go remote so they could live the nomad life. The vast majority of respondents stated that freedom and flexibility that the remote lifestyle provides was their main motivator. Less than a quarter of the respondents actually identified as digital nomads. 17% of those travel to 5+ countries a year.

According to the study, those who’ve worked remotely for under a year are more likely to have gone remote to combine work & travel (11% vs 6.5% of those who’ve worked remotely for seven years or more). This data suggests that the thrill of traveling the world without a home-base might wear off after the first few months and the average person in 2018 may actually be less nomadic than we might think. Interestingly, women were slightly more likely to have gone remote so they could ‘live the nomad lifestyle’ (11% vs. 8% male).

Say hello to the new rich: the remote white-collar worker that gets paid to travel the world or really just work from anywhere they want to. The top 10% of remote workers has an income of over $100k USD per year. However, if you look closer at the income breakdown, you will see that the vast majority of them makes less than $50k USD per year. This suggests that many of these highly educated individuals may actually not be incentivized by money but would rather accept a smaller paycheck if that buys them their freedom and flexibility. Employers read carefully! This means that you might be able acquire highly skilled remote talent for lower than average salaries.

The cash is in the code. Out of all the professionals surveyed, engineers outearn other professions. 19% of remote engineers earn more than $100,000 USD per year while only 11% of Marketing pros and 8% of Creatives make that kind of money.

There’s a remote work pay gap: Men are more likely to earn six figures than women (13% vs. 8%). This is partly to do with differences in the industries and professional choices that men and women choose to work in. While 16% of men work in engineering roles, which is the top earning remote profession, only 11% of women state the same. On the other hand, women are more likely to work in Marketing/PR (18.6% vs 11.62% male), which is not one of the top earning remote professions.

Forever Anywhere: Anywhere Workers are new to the game… but they are here to stay. The trend of working remotely is relatively new with 73% having gone remote in the last 4 years. Yet, this is not a short-lived trend. Nearly 80% of respondents want to work remotely as long as possible.

All of these results together suggest that the typical millennial “digital nomad” may not be what people think it is. The remote workers are growing up and painting a more realistic picture of what the future of the workforce will truly look like. The workforce of tomorrow will consist of anywhere workers rather than digital nomads: they don’t want to flee to white sandy beaches and run online businesses while sipping margaritas at the beach in Bali…but they want to know that they could… if they wanted to.

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What to Look Out For When Hiring a New CISO By JC Gaillard

hiring new ciso

The traditional role of the CISO is changing.

It is being challenged by emerging new regulations such as GDPR, which are impacting all industry sectors, and the arrival on the scene of the new role of the DPO in many firms.

It is being marginalized by long-term digital transformation trends which are changing the historical role of the CIO, and the emergence of broader corporate concepts, such as resilience, which are bringing out a more holistic way to address business protection matters from the Board down.

At the same time, the CISO role has never been more important, in the wake of non-stop cyber attacks and data breaches.

Hiring a new CISO could be hard for many firms and finding the right person will involve a careful approach, articulated around the following principles.

The broad profile of the role must be clear: Fire fighter, figurehead or change agent?

First of all, the hiring manager must be clear about the nature and objectives of the role, and the context in which the hire is taking place. It could be that the firm has never had a CISO before. It could be that a new role is being created, for example at Group level. It could be that the departing CISO was perceived as highly successful and that their departure is a big loss. It could be that the departing CISO had been in the job for many years but had achieved very little in practice.

At high level, the hiring manager must define the broad profile of the role: Firefighter? Figurehead? Change agent?

In all cases, security is becoming a far more complex and transversal matter and getting results will mean that the CISO will have to work across corporate silos, with IT, HR, other support functions, business units and geographies. The managerial complexity of the role and the level of experience required to be successful must be acknowledged.

Management experience is paramount; more than raw technical knowledge

The role of the CISO is no longer some form of low-grade tech job. Even more, it is no longer a role for a junior executive, a life-long consultant or an ex-auditor: It will require grit and a true field experience to achieve anything. And preferably a good amount of knowledge of the industry sector and corporate politics. Those only come with real-life management experience.

Judging by what we see in the field, an internal assignment is generally more productive, and less risky, as the new CISO will know the firm and will be known to key stakeholders. But it means the CISO role must have a truly senior profile to attract the best internally, that incentives package and role visibility have to be right, and that the reporting line must match all those factors.

The new CISO does not have to be a technologist or someone already in a CISO role. As a matter of fact, key will be in their ability to articulate the business value of security, and that should come more naturally to business leaders. Control-mindedness, personal gravitas and political acumen are likely to be important success attributes for the CISO, probably as important – if not more – than their raw technical knowledge of the security field.

Think outside the box and take your time

This is definitely the type of search for which thinking outside the box could be rewarded, and where most will come – in terms of long-term success – from the personal profile of the individual involved.

Overall, take your time. It is likely the role will be difficult to fill and rushing into appointing someone “because you need to” will only lead to mistakes. Use an interim CISO if necessary until the right person is found, but you must not hire in a hurry.

This is all the more important for organizations which have never had a CISO before, or those which have been stuck in a decade-long spiral of failure around security matters.

It is also essential for those creating a new CISO role for example at Group level, or those moving towards a CSO type of organizational model, as highlighted here by McKinsey and Co.

The CISO role has never been more important.

The firms that fail at appointing a new CISO are those which rush and push an inexperienced techie in a poorly defined role.

Positioning the role accurately in relation to the firm’s objectives around security, thinking it as a senior leadership role, and taking the time to find the right leader are the keys to long-term success.

Originally published on Corix Partners.

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10 Ways to Boost Your Business’s Cybersecurity By Deji Atoyebi

TheDigitalWay / Pixabay

With the frequency of data breaches and attacks on the rise, it’s no longer an option for companies to have a weak defense to secure themselves against these cyberattacks. Just last year, these attacks hit companies big and small, and many individuals were hit by cybercriminals retrieving their credit card or banking information. As a result, organizations and individuals all across the globe grew afraid of the harsh reality regarding cyberattacks.

Because of this, business leaders and IT experts have to establish cybersecurity methods that work to protect the institutions they’re designed for — and keep criminals out. These 10 tactics can help shore up your company’s cybersecurity.

1. Data Encryption

From Social Security numbers to bank account information, hackers are on the prowl to retrieve this valuable data. That makes it critical for you to implement reliable, top-notch data encryption services. Encryption experts believe it’s no longer possible to build a fortress around a business’s data. Instead, encryption — scrambling data so it’s unreadable to everyone but the intended recipient — is the best safeguard against someone determined to get in.

2. Hardware Security

Some cyberattacks come through hardware besides your computer system. Thus, you must utilize securing features on desktops, laptops, mobile devices, printers, etc. There are secure services available, like USB security keys, locks for servers and encryption for hardware. You can also track down stolen desktops, laptops and mobile devices through cloud computing software.

Laptops have a higher risk of being stolen or lost than desktops because of their portability; extra steps must be used to protect sensitive data. It’s also very important not to leave your laptop in your vehicle. If you absolutely must, you should leave it in the trunk — the least visible place in your vehicle.

3. Strong Passwords for Better Business’s Cybersecurity

Don’t use passwords an individual could easily guess if he knew you well enough. You shouldn’t use any personal information, like your birthdate; avoid the backward spelling of common words or easy sequences, such as sequential numbers or letters. A hard-to-crack password should include a combination of symbols, numbers and upper- and lowercase letters for a total of at least eight characters. This may seem like a pain when it comes to remembering your password, but it will ultimately keep your company safer.

Other password advice includes instructing every employee to have his or her own username and password. This makes it easy to detect whether a person hacked, or attempted to hack, someone’s computer. Once detected, your cybersecurity company will react with the correct incident response, and you can immediately update the password and use other measures for security.

4. A High-Quality Firewall

Firewalls are mandatory. They guard your network by controlling the internet traffic flow that comes in and out of your company. Most firewalls are so vigilant about filtering out threats that they’ll block dangerous websites altogether. And if customizing your software firewalls isn’t enough, you can also install hardware firewalls. These devices are installed on your network’s outer layer, such as your internet connection entry point.

5. Antivirus Protection

Anti-malware and antivirus protection are important for online security guarding. These packages are helpful for scanning your system for malware installations, as well as scanning your email attachments for viruses.

6. Regular Program Updates

The more updated your programs are, the more secure your systems will be. Updating your software regularly will keep you from leaving gaping holes open to hackers. Programmers have often fixed or addressed recent issues since the last program update, so take advantage of the free security.

7. Mobile Device Security

Because smartphones carry so much valuable information now that they’re just as important as company computers. Like laptops, they’re also easier to lose or have stolen. Thus, password protection, encryption software and remote wiping are essentials. Remote wiping is a very effective method that completely wipes a smartphone clean of valuable information when it’s lost or stolen, and the owner of the phone can enable this feature at a moment’s notice.

8. Regular Backups

Regular backups are vital; an external hard drive is a strong method for backing up data. Many external hard drives can be set up to make copies of data daily, weekly or monthly. It’s also a good idea to back up your information in the cloud. This enables you to easily retrieve your information in case your computer system has been lost, stolen or damaged.

9. Diligent Monitoring

You must hire staff to monitor your systems on a constant basis and be ready for an incident response the moment an attack or threat occurs. If your team is too small to justify investing in an in-house IT security person, outsource this vital task.

One good software for monitoring your system is data-leakage prevention. Set up at main touchpoints of the network to search for specific data coming out of the internal network, the configuration of this software can be narrowed to search for code pieces, credit card numbers or any information indicative of a breach.

1o. Staff Training

Educate your staff about the importance of online security, as well as the mandatory protocols. They must learn how to create a strong password; change this password every 90 days; avoid clicking on unknown links, emails or downloads; and ensure they log out when they’re done using their company devices.

Cyberattacks are on the rise like never before. As a result, businesses and individuals who’ve fallen victim to these attacks have lost millions of dollars. By investing in these methods, you can ensure your business, family, financial well-being and privacy remain intact. It took a lot of hard work to build your company — don’t let a hacker demolish it in minutes.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://bit.ly/2MU8R3I

10 Ways to Boost Your Business’s Cybersecurity By Deji Atoyebi

TheDigitalWay / Pixabay

With the frequency of data breaches and attacks on the rise, it’s no longer an option for companies to have a weak defense to secure themselves against these cyberattacks. Just last year, these attacks hit companies big and small, and many individuals were hit by cybercriminals retrieving their credit card or banking information. As a result, organizations and individuals all across the globe grew afraid of the harsh reality regarding cyberattacks.

Because of this, business leaders and IT experts have to establish cybersecurity methods that work to protect the institutions they’re designed for — and keep criminals out. These 10 tactics can help shore up your company’s cybersecurity.

1. Data Encryption

From Social Security numbers to bank account information, hackers are on the prowl to retrieve this valuable data. That makes it critical for you to implement reliable, top-notch data encryption services. Encryption experts believe it’s no longer possible to build a fortress around a business’s data. Instead, encryption — scrambling data so it’s unreadable to everyone but the intended recipient — is the best safeguard against someone determined to get in.

2. Hardware Security

Some cyberattacks come through hardware besides your computer system. Thus, you must utilize securing features on desktops, laptops, mobile devices, printers, etc. There are secure services available, like USB security keys, locks for servers and encryption for hardware. You can also track down stolen desktops, laptops and mobile devices through cloud computing software.

Laptops have a higher risk of being stolen or lost than desktops because of their portability; extra steps must be used to protect sensitive data. It’s also very important not to leave your laptop in your vehicle. If you absolutely must, you should leave it in the trunk — the least visible place in your vehicle.

3. Strong Passwords for Better Business’s Cybersecurity

Don’t use passwords an individual could easily guess if he knew you well enough. You shouldn’t use any personal information, like your birthdate; avoid the backward spelling of common words or easy sequences, such as sequential numbers or letters. A hard-to-crack password should include a combination of symbols, numbers and upper- and lowercase letters for a total of at least eight characters. This may seem like a pain when it comes to remembering your password, but it will ultimately keep your company safer.

Other password advice includes instructing every employee to have his or her own username and password. This makes it easy to detect whether a person hacked, or attempted to hack, someone’s computer. Once detected, your cybersecurity company will react with the correct incident response, and you can immediately update the password and use other measures for security.

4. A High-Quality Firewall

Firewalls are mandatory. They guard your network by controlling the internet traffic flow that comes in and out of your company. Most firewalls are so vigilant about filtering out threats that they’ll block dangerous websites altogether. And if customizing your software firewalls isn’t enough, you can also install hardware firewalls. These devices are installed on your network’s outer layer, such as your internet connection entry point.

5. Antivirus Protection

Anti-malware and antivirus protection are important for online security guarding. These packages are helpful for scanning your system for malware installations, as well as scanning your email attachments for viruses.

6. Regular Program Updates

The more updated your programs are, the more secure your systems will be. Updating your software regularly will keep you from leaving gaping holes open to hackers. Programmers have often fixed or addressed recent issues since the last program update, so take advantage of the free security.

7. Mobile Device Security

Because smartphones carry so much valuable information now that they’re just as important as company computers. Like laptops, they’re also easier to lose or have stolen. Thus, password protection, encryption software and remote wiping are essentials. Remote wiping is a very effective method that completely wipes a smartphone clean of valuable information when it’s lost or stolen, and the owner of the phone can enable this feature at a moment’s notice.

8. Regular Backups

Regular backups are vital; an external hard drive is a strong method for backing up data. Many external hard drives can be set up to make copies of data daily, weekly or monthly. It’s also a good idea to back up your information in the cloud. This enables you to easily retrieve your information in case your computer system has been lost, stolen or damaged.

9. Diligent Monitoring

You must hire staff to monitor your systems on a constant basis and be ready for an incident response the moment an attack or threat occurs. If your team is too small to justify investing in an in-house IT security person, outsource this vital task.

One good software for monitoring your system is data-leakage prevention. Set up at main touchpoints of the network to search for specific data coming out of the internal network, the configuration of this software can be narrowed to search for code pieces, credit card numbers or any information indicative of a breach.

1o. Staff Training

Educate your staff about the importance of online security, as well as the mandatory protocols. They must learn how to create a strong password; change this password every 90 days; avoid clicking on unknown links, emails or downloads; and ensure they log out when they’re done using their company devices.

Cyberattacks are on the rise like never before. As a result, businesses and individuals who’ve fallen victim to these attacks have lost millions of dollars. By investing in these methods, you can ensure your business, family, financial well-being and privacy remain intact. It took a lot of hard work to build your company — don’t let a hacker demolish it in minutes.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://bit.ly/2MU8R3I

What Is Industry 4.0? By Donna Campbell

Industry 4.0, or the Fourth Industrial Revolution, is a new approach to combining traditional manufacturing processes and technology, such as the Internet of Things (IOT), and Artificial Intelligence (AI) to improve automation, communication and use of real-time data. It holds the promise of better synergy between machines and their human counterparts and will help manufacturers to innovate faster. All humans in your company – from the shop floor to the top floor, will be empowered and impacted by Industry 4.0 so it is important to get up to speed and stay on top of emerging technologies.

Industry 4.0 And The Smart Factory

At the heart of Industry 4.0 is the smart factory – a place where big data flows steadily from well-connected operations and production centers to drive all parts of the business. A smart factory can predict change, and has the ability to quickly adapt operations to meet customer demands. Smart factories are agile and learn from data in real time. This agility helps manufacturers enter new markets, respond to disruptive trends in their industry, deliver better or new products, and get ahead of operational challenges like equipment maintenance and downtime.

The 5 Core Features of a Smart Factory

According to Deloitte Analysis, smart factories are:

  1. Connected – Processes, machines, and humans are connected to provide real-time data to make decisions.
  2. Optimized – Increased uptime and productivity, and highly automated with minimal human interaction.
  3. Transparent – Visibility of customer demand forecasts, order tracking, and other live metrics that allow for real-time decision making.
  4. Proactive – Constantly stocking and replenishing materials, early identification of supplier quality issues, and real-time safety monitoring.
  5. Agile – Adaptable scheduling changeovers, implementation of product changes in real time, and configurable factory layouts and equipment.

WBG-Email-Industry4.0-bodyimage

Manufacturers Preparing for Industry 4.0

What should manufacturing companies be doing right now to fully adopt Industry 4.0? Experts say you should start small, especially if you have limited resources to make the transition. It will be an ongoing evolution, not a ‘one and done’ effort and you’ll have to recruit, hire and train the right talent to help you with Industry 4.0 adoption. Experts also recommend that organizations appoint individuals or teams to monitor emerging technologies to stay on top of trends. As you progress, your company will have to continually test technologies, processes, and people to make sure that you have the right mix before you fully commit to any or all.

Marketing and Industry 4.0

Marketing is a key component in the adoption of Industry 4.0. Digitizing your marketing efforts will make you more connected, agile, proactive and optimized. When you’re ready to automate your marketing and leverage data to better understand your customer behavior, we’re ready to help.

Preparing for Industry 4.0 can seem like a daunting task. Breaking it up into smaller initiatives and working with outside experts as needed, will help you get there.

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Google Cloud Machine Types Comparison By Elaina Arce

Google Cloud Platform offers a range of machine types optimized to meet various needs. Machine types provide virtual hardware resources that vary by virtual CPU (vCPU), disk capability, and memory size, giving you a breadth of options. But with so much to choose from, finding the right Google Cloud machine type for your workload can get complicated.

In the spirit of our recent blog on EC2 instance types, we’re doing an overview of each Google Cloud machine type. This image shows the basics of what we will cover, but remember that you’ll want to investigate further to find the right machine type for your particular needs.

Predefined Machine Types

Predefined machine types are a fixed pool of resources managed by Google Compute Engine. They come in five “classes” or categories:

Standard (n1-standard)

Standard machine types work well with workloads that require a balance of CPU and memory. The n1-standard family of machine types come with 3.75 GB of memory per vCPU. There are 8 total in the series and they range from 3.75 to 360 GB of memory, corresponding accordingly with 1 to 96 vCPU.

High-Memory (n1-highmem)

High memory machine types work for just what you’d think they would – tasks that require more system memory as opposed to vCPUs. The n1-highmem family comes with 6.50 GB of memory per vCPU, offering 7 total varieties ranging from 13 to 624 GB in memory, corresponding accordingly with 2 to 96 vCPUs.

High-CPU (n1-highpcu)

If you’re looking for the most compute power, the n1-highcpu series is the way to go, offering 0.90 GB per vCPU. There are 7 options within the high cpu machine type family, ranging from 1.80 to 86.6GB and 2 to 96 vCPUS.

Shared-Core (f1-micro)

Share-core machine types are cost-effective and work well with small or batch workloads that only need to run for a short time. They provide a single vCPU that runs on one hyper-thread of the host CPU running your instance.

The f1-micro machine type family provides bursts of physical CPU for brief periods of time in moments of need. They’re like spikes in compute power that can only happen in the event that your workload requires more CPU than you had allocated. These bursts are only possible periodically and are not permanent.

Memory Optimized (n1-ultramem or n1-megamem)

For more intense workloads that require high memory but also more vCPU than that you’d get with the high-memory machine types, memory-optimized machine types are ideal. With more than 14 GB of memory per vCPU, Google suggests that you choose memory-optimized machine types for in-memory databases and analytics, genomics analysis, SQL analysis services, and more. These machine types are available based on zone and region.

Custom Machine Types

Predefined machine types vary to meet needs based on high memory, high vCPU, a balance of both, or both high memory and high vCPU. If that’s not enough to meet your needs, Google has one more option for you – custom machine types. With custom machine types, you can define exactly how many vCPUs you need and what amount of system memory for the instance. They’re a great fit if your workloads don’t quite match up with any of the available predefined types, or if you need more compute power or more memory, but don’t want to get bogged down by upgrades you don’t need that come with predefined types.

About GPUs and machine types

On top of your virtual machine instances, Google also offers graphics processing units (GPUs) that can be used to boost workloads for processes like machine learning and data processing. GPUs typically can only be attached to predefined machine types, but in some cases can also be placed with custom machine types depending on zone availability. In general, the higher number of GPUs attached to your instances, the higher number of vCPUs and system memory available to you.

What Google Cloud machine type should you use?

Between the predefined options and the ability to create custom Google Cloud machine types, Google offers enough variety for almost any application. Cost matters, but with the new resource-based pricing structure, the actual machine you chose matters less when it comes to pricing.

With good insight into your workload, usage trends, and business needs, you have the resources available to find the machine type that’s right for you.

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