CIA Triad: Best Practices for Securing Your Org By Shyam Oza

Navigating the labyrinth of cybersecurity can be confusing without a framework. On the other hand, force-fitting a prescriptive security framework to your organization’s unique business, technology, and regulatory requirements, can prove to be complex as well. If security controls are too restrictive, information becomes less readily available and business productivity suffers as a result. However, when security controls are looser than they should be, the potential for data loss and corruption is increased, which can also hinder productivity.

The CIA Triad walks the fine line between. It isn’t a top-secret, government-approved model, as the name may suggest, but a rather elegantly flexible model that can be applied to secure your organization’s information systems, applications, and network.

What is the CIA Triad?

The three governing principles of the CIA Triad are confidentiality, integrity, and availability.

Confidentiality

Confidentiality or privacy refers to measures taken to guarantee that data — particularly sensitive data — is protected from unauthorized access. In the age of GDPR, privacy is required to be a basic design consideration. The level confidentiality can vary based on the data type and/or regulation. For example, as per regulations like the GDPR, protecting customer data would mean going beyond mere authorized access, to piecemeal access only if the application absolutely requires it.

Integrity

Integrity pertains to safeguarding the accuracy of data as it moves through your workflows. It not only includes protecting data from unauthorized deletion or modification, but also should contain measures to quickly reverse the damage if a breach were to occur.

Availability

Availability, quite simply, means providing seamless, uninterrupted access to your users. This entails robust server and network infrastructure and high-availability mechanisms built into system design.

CIA triad security model

CIA Triad: Implementation Best Practices

Here are some best practices to implementing the CIA Triad of confidentiality, integrity, and availability.

Putting Confidentiality into Practice

  • Categorize data and assets being handled based on their privacy requirements.
  • Require data encryption and two-factor authentication to be basic security hygiene.
  • Ensure that access control lists, file permissions and white lists are monitored and updated regularly.
  • Train employees about privacy considerations both at a generic org-wide level, and as per the nature of their role.

Scoping Integrity

  • Review all data processing, transfer and storage mechanisms.
  • Version control, data logs, granular access control, and checksums can be useful to enforce integrity. Hash functions can further prevent data corruption.
  • Understand your organization’s compliance and regulatory requirements. For instance, GDPR permits data transfers to vendors in non-EU countries or other organizations, only if “adequate levels of protection” and “legal safeguards” are in place.
  • Invest in a dependable backup and recovery solution; one that assures business continuity and quick data recovery in the event of a security or data breach.

Ensuring Availability

  • Build preventive measures such as redundancy, failover, and Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) into system design. Make security audits routine. Auto-update or stay abreast of system, network, and application updates.
  • Utilize detection tools such as network/server monitoring software and anti-virus solutions.
  • Know that even highly-secure SaaS platforms and applications can experience downtime. Reliable cloud-based data backup ensures that all data can be accurately recovered in minutes.
  • Develop a Data Recovery and Business Continuity plan with detailed corrective measures in the event of data loss, including timely communication with customers.

As you secure your organization’s data and systems with the Confidentiality-Integrity-Availability model, keep in mind that even the best practices and tools benefit from a safety net. Which is exactly what a solid backup and recovery solution is – keeping data safe and recovery easy.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://bit.ly/2TTqxAG

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CIA Triad: Best Practices for Securing Your Org By Shyam Oza

Navigating the labyrinth of cybersecurity can be confusing without a framework. On the other hand, force-fitting a prescriptive security framework to your organization’s unique business, technology, and regulatory requirements, can prove to be complex as well. If security controls are too restrictive, information becomes less readily available and business productivity suffers as a result. However, when security controls are looser than they should be, the potential for data loss and corruption is increased, which can also hinder productivity.

The CIA Triad walks the fine line between. It isn’t a top-secret, government-approved model, as the name may suggest, but a rather elegantly flexible model that can be applied to secure your organization’s information systems, applications, and network.

What is the CIA Triad?

The three governing principles of the CIA Triad are confidentiality, integrity, and availability.

Confidentiality

Confidentiality or privacy refers to measures taken to guarantee that data — particularly sensitive data — is protected from unauthorized access. In the age of GDPR, privacy is required to be a basic design consideration. The level confidentiality can vary based on the data type and/or regulation. For example, as per regulations like the GDPR, protecting customer data would mean going beyond mere authorized access, to piecemeal access only if the application absolutely requires it.

Integrity

Integrity pertains to safeguarding the accuracy of data as it moves through your workflows. It not only includes protecting data from unauthorized deletion or modification, but also should contain measures to quickly reverse the damage if a breach were to occur.

Availability

Availability, quite simply, means providing seamless, uninterrupted access to your users. This entails robust server and network infrastructure and high-availability mechanisms built into system design.

CIA triad security model

CIA Triad: Implementation Best Practices

Here are some best practices to implementing the CIA Triad of confidentiality, integrity, and availability.

Putting Confidentiality into Practice

  • Categorize data and assets being handled based on their privacy requirements.
  • Require data encryption and two-factor authentication to be basic security hygiene.
  • Ensure that access control lists, file permissions and white lists are monitored and updated regularly.
  • Train employees about privacy considerations both at a generic org-wide level, and as per the nature of their role.

Scoping Integrity

  • Review all data processing, transfer and storage mechanisms.
  • Version control, data logs, granular access control, and checksums can be useful to enforce integrity. Hash functions can further prevent data corruption.
  • Understand your organization’s compliance and regulatory requirements. For instance, GDPR permits data transfers to vendors in non-EU countries or other organizations, only if “adequate levels of protection” and “legal safeguards” are in place.
  • Invest in a dependable backup and recovery solution; one that assures business continuity and quick data recovery in the event of a security or data breach.

Ensuring Availability

  • Build preventive measures such as redundancy, failover, and Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) into system design. Make security audits routine. Auto-update or stay abreast of system, network, and application updates.
  • Utilize detection tools such as network/server monitoring software and anti-virus solutions.
  • Know that even highly-secure SaaS platforms and applications can experience downtime. Reliable cloud-based data backup ensures that all data can be accurately recovered in minutes.
  • Develop a Data Recovery and Business Continuity plan with detailed corrective measures in the event of data loss, including timely communication with customers.

As you secure your organization’s data and systems with the Confidentiality-Integrity-Availability model, keep in mind that even the best practices and tools benefit from a safety net. Which is exactly what a solid backup and recovery solution is – keeping data safe and recovery easy.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://bit.ly/2TTqxAG

Disney Data Visualization: What Film Dialogue Can Teach Us About Intent Data By Jess Burns

Investing in third-party intent data gives you accurate, actionable, and targeted insights to fuel your marketing efforts. And while that sounds great in theory, you might wonder whether or not you’ll really see a return on your investment.

It’s not as if you’re at a loss for data. We have more first-party customer data at our fingertips than ever before. The problem is that so many opportunities fall through the cracks in spite of your abundance of first-party data.

Third-party intent data fills in the gaps of your first-party data to give you everything you need to close deals. But how?

Believe it or not, a data visualization of Disney film dialogue might be able to add a bit of clarity.

Data Visualization for Gender Inequality in Disney Films

In the wake of the #MeToo Movement, data analysts started to look more closely at how sexism plays out in the film world. Even if you think of Disney as a wholesome family brand, it probably comes as no surprise that the company isn’t immune to the issue of sexism.

But this particular data visualization from The Pudding might catch you off guard. With so many movies centered on princesses as lead characters, it’s crazy to see just how much male dialogue dominates the studio.

Even a modern Disney movie like Frozen—a unique film for the studio in that it focuses on not one but two female leads—still has a minority of female dialogue. Aladdin, Mulan, The Little Mermaid, Pocahontas—all with a minority of female lines.

And when you widen the scope from the 30ish Disney animated features to its larger portfolio, the situation grows bleaker.

The vast majority of films from the Disney studio are dominated by male dialogue. This analysis opens the door for a much deeper discussion about diversity in the movie business. But what does it really say about the screenwriters and directors involved in making these male-dominated movies?

Let’s assume that no one at the Disney studio actively went out of their way to minimize female dialogue in their movies. More likely, this is a deep-seated, subconscious issue that screenwriters, producers, and directors never gave a second thought. And this is where we can learn something about leveraging intent data.

Understanding Subtle Buyer Behavior with Intent Data

Personalizing your marketing efforts and improving the way you target potential buyers can’t happen with surface-level data. You spend so much time tracking KPIs for buyer behavior in your first-party channels—email open rates, content downloads, time spent on sales calls, etc.

These KPIs are all critical to your success. But they don’t tell the whole story. There are subtle buyer behaviors that won’t come through in first-party statistics. For instance, just because a prospect downloads a few pieces of content doesn’t mean they should be qualified for sales. And just because you have an abundance of first-party data doesn’t mean you have a complete picture of total active demand.

Third-party intent data provides insights into buyer behavior outside of your owned properties. That means understanding whether or not an account is in-market for your products, how prospects are interacting with your competitors, and where prospects are on the buyer’s journey in real time.

Having both first-party and third-party data gives you all of the insights necessary to uncover the subtle behaviors that could make or break a deal. And being able to visualize those behaviors by analyzing intent data with machine learning helps you recognize the most actionable insights.

Much like the Disney film dialogue data visualization shows the subtle existence of gender inequality, intent data visualizations reveal insights that make your marketing activities stand out against competitors.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://bit.ly/2Nk2JER

Data Blending: What You Can (and Can’t) Do in Google Data Studio By John Burton

Over the last 18 months or so, Google Data Studio has evolved from an appealing but clunky application to a tool that we recommend to any digital marketer.

Data Studio allows you to communicate data simply and in a repeatable format, and their expanded integrations, customizations, and editability have made Data Studio dashboards extremely powerful.

A relatively new feature, data blending, came out last year. This underused function can do a lot of cool things; it also has some limitations. Once you’ve got your head around the basics, the possibilities are endless.

What is data blending?

Data blending in Google Data Studio lets you create charts based on multiple data sources. Separate data sources—not just those from the same application—can be combined as long as they’re comparable (i.e. share a “join key,” something discussed more below).

explanation of data blending in google data studio.

Traditionally, if you wanted to create direct comparisons from different sources, you had to export data from each source and combine them in Excel. If you suddenly needed to study a longer timeframe, you had to download the data again and start over.

By default, each element in Data Studio pulls information from a single data source. You could hook up multiple data sources to a dashboard, but until the introduction of data blending, you couldn’t present those together in a single chart or table.

With a few clicks, data blending can reveal valuable relationships between data sets. Because everything happens within Data Studio, you save time on data manipulation and enjoy new opportunities to present findings.

Jon Meck, Senior Marketing Director at Bounteous, highlighted several benefits his team has identified:

Jon Meck

Jon Meck:

With a familiar and intuitive interface, we continue to find use cases for data blending that showcase the connected Google ecosystem, facilitate real-time decision-making, and save hours of manual work.

We love using it to combine third-party data around advertising details or CRM data, and it’s allowed us to bring in personal data from external sources that are off-limits for other Google products.

What can it offer your analytics team? Here’s what you need to know.

Keys are…key…to data blending

To blend data, the data sources need to share a common dimension. This is known as a “join key.” It’s the common denominator to compare data. Your join key could be a page URL, product name, user ID, or many other things.

The simplest join key is “Date.” Measuring things over time is a common part of data analysis, so let’s use that as an example.

Selecting “Date” as the join key lets you spot correlations in data sets. Want to see how many leads came into your CRM against compared to organic sessions last month? No problem:

sample use of data blending in data studio.

Choosing the right key depends on what you’re trying to illustrate. A good starting point is to come up with a hypothesis. For example, your hypothesis might be that “website users are more likely to pay via PayPal if they’re on a mobile device.”

In this instance, you’d combine data from your ecommerce platform with Google Analytics data. Transaction ID would be the join key. (You can find more examples in the table below.)

How to blend data in Google Data Studio

When it comes to data blending, there’s an easy way and a not-so-easy way.

The easy way to blend data

  1. Create two charts that you want to compare.
  2. Select both graphs (CTRL + Click).
  3. Right-click and hit “Blend data.”

As long as the two charts share a common dimension, Data Studio automatically combines your two charts into one. If you select two charts but a right-click offers no option to blend the data, your charts are unblendable.

The not-so-easy way to blend data

The second way to blend data is a little more involved but gives you more control.

  1. Click “Resource > Manage blended data.”
  2. Click “Add a data view.”
  3. In the panel displayed, select or search for the first data source you want to compare.
  4. Click the “Add another data source” button. This will be the second data source.
  5. Select a join key(s) available in both data sources.
  6. Select dimensions and metrics you want to compare.
  7. Adjust settings as usual and hit “Save.”
  8. Your new blended data source is now available when you select “Data source” for new charts.

Start with the easy option to get a feel for data blending before going with the not-so-easy way.

Importantly, data blending uses “left-outer join,” which means that charts and graphs contain all values from Data source A—whether or not there’s corresponding data in Data source B. Additionally, values in Data source B that do not exist in Data source A are ignored.

left-outer-join explanation for data blending.

The left-outer join setup in Google Data Studio affects how blended data appears in charts. (Image source)

If you want to learn more about how data blending works, Google offers some baseline documentation to get you started.

Practical applications for data blending in Google Data Studio

1. Overlaying line graphs from different data sources

Combining simple graphs shows relationships between data sets. For example, we wanted to demonstrate to a client that the keywords we tracked in Advanced Web Ranking (AWR) correlated with an increase in organic traffic:

example of blended data from two line charts.

Our blended data combined organic sessions from Google Analytics with AWR’s Visibility Score. Date was our join key. The correlation wasn’t a surprise, but it confirmed the success of our SEO campaign.

Whether you’re an agency or an in-house marketer, being able to demonstrate the value of what you’re doing is essential. Often, data visualization helps you present something you already know clearly and persuasively.

2. Combining Google Analytics data with imported data

Have you ever wanted to see data from all your tools at a glance? Well, you can. Data Studio allows you to blend data from other sources. Even if you’re not keen on forking out for Google’s Partner Connectors, any third-party data can be tapped into via a file upload or Google Sheets connection.

The example below shows data from Google Trends on interest in Wimbledon (the tennis tournament) compared to visits to a website that sells Wimbledon tickets.

blended data from google trends and website sessions.

We produced this graph for one of our clients. They invest a lot in inbound marketing and wanted to know why their traffic was so much lower on peak sales days. As their PPC agency, we had to justify this dip. We hadn’t taken our foot off the gas, so what was the cause?

We discovered that news and press activity had a huge impact on people searching for Wimbledon. On the low-traffic days in question, the sports press was divided, discussing the Women’s World Cup and cricket as much as tennis.

The drop in Google Trends for “Wimbledon” correlated with website sessions. Data blending allowed us to demonstrate these traffic blips to the client. The revelation also informed their marketing strategy for next year.

Without native integration of a data source in Data Studio, your best option is Google Sheets. It allows you to tweak your data on the fly without having to upload it again. If your Google Sheet runs scripts that update the data in real-time, your Data Studio blends will update, too.

3. Combining Google Analytics with CRM and ecommerce platform data

Connecting website data with a CRM or ecommerce platform can reveal fascinating insights. While BigQuery and Google Analytics 360 allow you to do this without data blending in Google Data Studio, that convenience comes with a six-figure price tag.

A User ID, assigned at purchase or user login, can act as a join key to connect website data directly to individual site users. In the example below, we’ve connected pageview data from Google Analytics with supplier accounts in a CRM.

blended data from ecommerce platform and google analytics.

The blended data helped the client’s sales team suggest products to cross-sell to key accounts. In this example, Data Studio’s “filter controls” let the viewer select the partner account and date range.

Similarly, as Morgan Jones details in a post for Practical Ecommerce, data blending can help calculate new metrics, like net profit by SKU. Jones’ example blends data from two sources:

  1. A table that includes products’ wholesale cost by SKU (“COGS”);
  2. Google Analytics sales data.

By combining those sources, Jones was able to create a table with the net profit of each product:

blending skus and google analytics data in data studio. (Image source)

More examples

The possibilities for data blending are nearly endless. Here are a few more:

Data source 1Data source 2Metric comparisonInsight gainedJoin key(s)

Google Analytics Google Search Console Correlate organic search impressions to organic traffic Determine whether increases in SERP visibility are impacting traffic to drive future SEO strategy Page
Google Ads Google Search Console Compare paid search impressions to organic search impressions Assess overall SERP visibility for paid and organic traffic sources Search term / Query
Google Analytics Ecommerce platform Compare product stock levels to product sales via website Spot check inventory against product sales; manage stock for busy/slow periods Product
Google Analytics Google Sheets Correlate any metric to blog length, title style, etc. Compare blog post performance to editorial decisions Page
Google Analytics (Site 1) Google Analytics (Site 2) Compare the performance of two websites Visualize the performance trend of a portfolio of websites in a single chart or table Any Dimension

Of course, no new feature is perfect, and several early-adopters have felt the pain.

The limitations of data blending in Data Studio

Portent’s Michael Wiegand has written about data blending in Google Data Studio multiple times. His articles have showcased the potential promise—and limitations—of data blending.

When asked about some of the wrinkles he’s encountered, he listed three:

Michael Wiegand

Michael Wiegand:

1. Sometimes you have to re-aggregate metrics in your formulas when creating custom fields that involve two metrics from different data sources to get them to work for date ranges any longer than one day.

For example, instead of Pageviews from Data Source A/Sessions from Data Source B, you need to state Sum(Pageviews DS A)/Sum(Sessions DS B).

2. There are several threads about this in the Google Marketing Partners forum for Data Studio, but since data blending works on a left-join basis, if there’s historical data in the left-most data source that isn’t also present on the data sources to the right, previous period or previous year date-range comparisons will return no percentage-change data.

3. We’ve also run into a limit on data sources with blending. A maximum of 5 data sources are allowed in any one blend.

Oeuyown Kim, an Analytics Strategist at Portent, shared additional details on the limitations identified by Wiegand.

Oeuyown Kim

Oeuyown Kim:

GDS does not replace “null” values with zeros when there’s no value available for a metric in the Outer Left Join Key.

For example, in the image below, instead of summing the values that do exist, GDS will show “null” if there’s no value for “Transactions” for a date—even if there are transaction values in the other columns, Transaction (EN) and Transaction (FR).

Similarly, Kim continued,

When there’s no comparison value for one row, Google Data Studio shows all comparison values as “null.” In the image below, no comparison values appear for any row in the highlighted columns—even though deltas exist for three of them.

When I raised this issue to the Google Data Studio team, their “solution” was to recommend that I not show any comparison metrics.

Not every limitation has a clear explanation, either:

In multiple configurations, I’ve attempted to join 3–5 data sources and found that values can be summed for only the first two.

In the example below, I can add metrics together in the two left data sources, but the value goes “null” as soon as I attempt to add in a value from the third or fourth. I can swap around the data sources in any order, and GDS will still sum up only the values found in the two left spots.

There does not seem to be any identifiable consistency in what causes these errors. I have successfully blended up to three Google Analytics data sources and five Google Sheets data sources before. But even when blending three GA data sources, I was not able to apply a secondary join key (device type, campaign, or keyword) without it miscalculating totals.

A final limitation, one that we’ve encountered, is the inability to combine data blending with calculated metrics.

Conclusion

Data blending helps you create Google Data Studio dashboards that are dynamic, real-time visualizations of the metrics that define marketing success.

Over time, as Google connects its data vizualization platform with more third-party data sources, data blending will make comparisons easier and more powerful.

Getting started with data blending now will better position you and your team to take advantage of those impending improvements. Here are the key takeaways:

  • Data blending lets you compare up to five data sources in a single table or graph.
  • A common dimension, called a join key, connects data from different sources.
  • Start with a hypothesis before deciding on which sources to blend.
  • Don’t overcomplicate matters. You can blend more than two data sources, but the goal is to present clean, clear data to stakeholders and clients.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://bit.ly/30iVP6p

Google Fuchsia OS: How It Can Replace Android and Chrome By Mitesh Patel

Google Fuchsia OS- How It can Replace Android and Chrome?

It all started in 2016 when Google started working on its ambitious operating system called Fuchsia. This news got mixed reactions from the mobile industry. Some experts believed it the next big thing in the OS domain that can replace Android OS. However, the software giant Google has not uttered a single word about Fuchsia OS until last year.

After revealing the home screen design of Fuchsia OS last year, Google has integrated into the Pixelbook. In a way, we can think of its future role in replacing Android and Chrome. Let’s dive deep into this emerging operating system for mobile and its possible impact on mobile app development services.

Fuchsia OS- Concept and Scope

Google wanted to develop a ‘universal’ operating system that can seamlessly run across all the platforms like smart devices, tablets, and smartphones. Fuchsia OS is evolved in the form of Zircon, a micro-kernel. Android and Chrome OS, on the other hand, are heavy versions of Linux kernel. In such a situation, the micro-kernel based Fuchsia OS can remain very handy.

When it comes to smaller yet more efficient OS, Fuchsia OS seems an ideal fit as a next-gen operating system. What makes Fuchsia OS more special is the fact that it is completely managed and controlled by the parent company Google, whereas Android OS is largely controlled by its users.

Impact of Fuchsia OS on Mobile App Development Company

Let’s find an answer to an interesting question- What will be the impact of Fuchsia OS on the developer’s life? Though developers have no access to the new OS, it is fair to mention that developers can freely make apps using any programming language for Fuchsia OS after getting access. A new Flutter SDK (Software Development Kit) makes it possible. Flutter supports mobile app development solution for various operating systems like iOS, Android, and Fuchsia.

In other words, developers can make an app that can run seamlessly on any platforms with Flutter SDK, and entrepreneurs need to pay less mobile app development cost. Flutter also supports Material Design, Google’s official design standard. It also supports advanced UI elements including 120 FPS animations and volumetric shadows.

Talking about Fuchsia OS, it is designed to support Swift and Objective language along with Android OS and Chrome. When this OS is released in a full swing, developers will certainly get a robust platform for developing cross-platform apps and the mobile app development company will leverage the benefits of a smooth transition of apps.

Google Fuchsia OS- A Closer Look into Features

We have already seen a home screen of Google Fuchsia OS. It provides vertical scrolling for the list of apps. It has a profile card that includes a profile image, some basic settings, and date. Its search bar is similar to Android devices and Gboard, but it has a few unique features. Though apps do not run on this OS yet, users may get impressed by experiencing its multitasking features. For example, if the user drags one app onto another, they can get a split-screen option that can be used to drag more apps at once.

Key Features of Google Fuchsia OS

Though the development of Fuchsia OS is in the nascent stage, we can make a list of a few outstanding features of it.

1. User Interface (UI)

The UI of an upcoming Google OS is made of Material Design. It has special renderer and Escher for developing shadows. What’s more, factors like components, buttons, windows, and pop up boxes are layered clearly. Layouts are said to be of two types with the following codenames-Armadillo- Shortcuts module and app drawer are absent whereas Quick Settings, Google Feed, and Recent Apps are present.

Capybara- This is a traditional desktop layout with a placeholder and a taskbar. The taskbar is somewhat similar to a start button.

2. Assistant-friendly

One thing is certain. Google Fuchsia OS is more Google Assistant-friendly than Android. The mobile app development company can utilize its features like apps drawer, camera use, and on-screen activity to enhance Google Assistant-based features.

We can expect that Fuchsia will go in more detail and enable to fetch more information than its traditional counterpart, Android OS. Such enhanced support can enhance the scope for more features and functionality.

3. Cross-device Support

This is one of the most important features from the perspective of mobile app development services. Today, we have a number of devices available across different platforms ranging from smartphones to wearables and laptops to tablets. Google Fuchsia OS is designed to work on any devices with the same user experience. Its cross-device support enables mobile app developers to build apps once and run them on multiple devices.

These days, companies want to address a huge audience across the world irrespective of devices and platforms. Now it is easy to hire mobile app developers to build an app for Fuchsia OS and enable the customers or app users to use the app through their Google accounts.

4. Customized Kernel

Fuchsia OS has its custom kernel, Zircon, which can be readily upgraded as and when necessary. Unlike Android and Chrome OS, Fuchsia OS enables developers to get access to the direct kernel. As a result, such apps can enhance the security of the device and remain compatible after a system upgrade.

It is fair to mention that developers will come up with a more powerful, cross-platform mobile app development solution with the help of Google Fuchsia OS.

Concluding Lines

Much-anticipated Fuchsia OS is still in the development phase at Google. It is not possible to give the exact date of its arrival at this point. We can only mention that Fuchsia OS will be a real thing with significant support of Google. You can feel the virtual existence of this OS in Google’s own repository and GitHub. The development team works on various aspects and deals with different issues every day for releasing futuristic Fuchsia OS.

We offer enterprise-grade mobile app development services globally. Our in-house team of experienced Android app developers can come up with the next-gen apps by integrating technological advancements of futuristic technologies like AI, AR, and IoT.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://bit.ly/2TNdsJ6

Google Fuchsia OS: How It Can Replace Android and Chrome By Mitesh Patel

Google Fuchsia OS- How It can Replace Android and Chrome?

It all started in 2016 when Google started working on its ambitious operating system called Fuchsia. This news got mixed reactions from the mobile industry. Some experts believed it the next big thing in the OS domain that can replace Android OS. However, the software giant Google has not uttered a single word about Fuchsia OS until last year.

After revealing the home screen design of Fuchsia OS last year, Google has integrated into the Pixelbook. In a way, we can think of its future role in replacing Android and Chrome. Let’s dive deep into this emerging operating system for mobile and its possible impact on mobile app development services.

Fuchsia OS- Concept and Scope

Google wanted to develop a ‘universal’ operating system that can seamlessly run across all the platforms like smart devices, tablets, and smartphones. Fuchsia OS is evolved in the form of Zircon, a micro-kernel. Android and Chrome OS, on the other hand, are heavy versions of Linux kernel. In such a situation, the micro-kernel based Fuchsia OS can remain very handy.

When it comes to smaller yet more efficient OS, Fuchsia OS seems an ideal fit as a next-gen operating system. What makes Fuchsia OS more special is the fact that it is completely managed and controlled by the parent company Google, whereas Android OS is largely controlled by its users.

Impact of Fuchsia OS on Mobile App Development Company

Let’s find an answer to an interesting question- What will be the impact of Fuchsia OS on the developer’s life? Though developers have no access to the new OS, it is fair to mention that developers can freely make apps using any programming language for Fuchsia OS after getting access. A new Flutter SDK (Software Development Kit) makes it possible. Flutter supports mobile app development solution for various operating systems like iOS, Android, and Fuchsia.

In other words, developers can make an app that can run seamlessly on any platforms with Flutter SDK, and entrepreneurs need to pay less mobile app development cost. Flutter also supports Material Design, Google’s official design standard. It also supports advanced UI elements including 120 FPS animations and volumetric shadows.

Talking about Fuchsia OS, it is designed to support Swift and Objective language along with Android OS and Chrome. When this OS is released in a full swing, developers will certainly get a robust platform for developing cross-platform apps and the mobile app development company will leverage the benefits of a smooth transition of apps.

Google Fuchsia OS- A Closer Look into Features

We have already seen a home screen of Google Fuchsia OS. It provides vertical scrolling for the list of apps. It has a profile card that includes a profile image, some basic settings, and date. Its search bar is similar to Android devices and Gboard, but it has a few unique features. Though apps do not run on this OS yet, users may get impressed by experiencing its multitasking features. For example, if the user drags one app onto another, they can get a split-screen option that can be used to drag more apps at once.

Key Features of Google Fuchsia OS

Though the development of Fuchsia OS is in the nascent stage, we can make a list of a few outstanding features of it.

1. User Interface (UI)

The UI of an upcoming Google OS is made of Material Design. It has special renderer and Escher for developing shadows. What’s more, factors like components, buttons, windows, and pop up boxes are layered clearly. Layouts are said to be of two types with the following codenames-Armadillo- Shortcuts module and app drawer are absent whereas Quick Settings, Google Feed, and Recent Apps are present.

Capybara- This is a traditional desktop layout with a placeholder and a taskbar. The taskbar is somewhat similar to a start button.

2. Assistant-friendly

One thing is certain. Google Fuchsia OS is more Google Assistant-friendly than Android. The mobile app development company can utilize its features like apps drawer, camera use, and on-screen activity to enhance Google Assistant-based features.

We can expect that Fuchsia will go in more detail and enable to fetch more information than its traditional counterpart, Android OS. Such enhanced support can enhance the scope for more features and functionality.

3. Cross-device Support

This is one of the most important features from the perspective of mobile app development services. Today, we have a number of devices available across different platforms ranging from smartphones to wearables and laptops to tablets. Google Fuchsia OS is designed to work on any devices with the same user experience. Its cross-device support enables mobile app developers to build apps once and run them on multiple devices.

These days, companies want to address a huge audience across the world irrespective of devices and platforms. Now it is easy to hire mobile app developers to build an app for Fuchsia OS and enable the customers or app users to use the app through their Google accounts.

4. Customized Kernel

Fuchsia OS has its custom kernel, Zircon, which can be readily upgraded as and when necessary. Unlike Android and Chrome OS, Fuchsia OS enables developers to get access to the direct kernel. As a result, such apps can enhance the security of the device and remain compatible after a system upgrade.

It is fair to mention that developers will come up with a more powerful, cross-platform mobile app development solution with the help of Google Fuchsia OS.

Concluding Lines

Much-anticipated Fuchsia OS is still in the development phase at Google. It is not possible to give the exact date of its arrival at this point. We can only mention that Fuchsia OS will be a real thing with significant support of Google. You can feel the virtual existence of this OS in Google’s own repository and GitHub. The development team works on various aspects and deals with different issues every day for releasing futuristic Fuchsia OS.

We offer enterprise-grade mobile app development services globally. Our in-house team of experienced Android app developers can come up with the next-gen apps by integrating technological advancements of futuristic technologies like AI, AR, and IoT.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://bit.ly/2TNdsJ6

Google Fuchsia OS: How It Can Replace Android and Chrome By Mitesh Patel

Google Fuchsia OS- How It can Replace Android and Chrome?

It all started in 2016 when Google started working on its ambitious operating system called Fuchsia. This news got mixed reactions from the mobile industry. Some experts believed it the next big thing in the OS domain that can replace Android OS. However, the software giant Google has not uttered a single word about Fuchsia OS until last year.

After revealing the home screen design of Fuchsia OS last year, Google has integrated into the Pixelbook. In a way, we can think of its future role in replacing Android and Chrome. Let’s dive deep into this emerging operating system for mobile and its possible impact on mobile app development services.

Fuchsia OS- Concept and Scope

Google wanted to develop a ‘universal’ operating system that can seamlessly run across all the platforms like smart devices, tablets, and smartphones. Fuchsia OS is evolved in the form of Zircon, a micro-kernel. Android and Chrome OS, on the other hand, are heavy versions of Linux kernel. In such a situation, the micro-kernel based Fuchsia OS can remain very handy.

When it comes to smaller yet more efficient OS, Fuchsia OS seems an ideal fit as a next-gen operating system. What makes Fuchsia OS more special is the fact that it is completely managed and controlled by the parent company Google, whereas Android OS is largely controlled by its users.

Impact of Fuchsia OS on Mobile App Development Company

Let’s find an answer to an interesting question- What will be the impact of Fuchsia OS on the developer’s life? Though developers have no access to the new OS, it is fair to mention that developers can freely make apps using any programming language for Fuchsia OS after getting access. A new Flutter SDK (Software Development Kit) makes it possible. Flutter supports mobile app development solution for various operating systems like iOS, Android, and Fuchsia.

In other words, developers can make an app that can run seamlessly on any platforms with Flutter SDK, and entrepreneurs need to pay less mobile app development cost. Flutter also supports Material Design, Google’s official design standard. It also supports advanced UI elements including 120 FPS animations and volumetric shadows.

Talking about Fuchsia OS, it is designed to support Swift and Objective language along with Android OS and Chrome. When this OS is released in a full swing, developers will certainly get a robust platform for developing cross-platform apps and the mobile app development company will leverage the benefits of a smooth transition of apps.

Google Fuchsia OS- A Closer Look into Features

We have already seen a home screen of Google Fuchsia OS. It provides vertical scrolling for the list of apps. It has a profile card that includes a profile image, some basic settings, and date. Its search bar is similar to Android devices and Gboard, but it has a few unique features. Though apps do not run on this OS yet, users may get impressed by experiencing its multitasking features. For example, if the user drags one app onto another, they can get a split-screen option that can be used to drag more apps at once.

Key Features of Google Fuchsia OS

Though the development of Fuchsia OS is in the nascent stage, we can make a list of a few outstanding features of it.

1. User Interface (UI)

The UI of an upcoming Google OS is made of Material Design. It has special renderer and Escher for developing shadows. What’s more, factors like components, buttons, windows, and pop up boxes are layered clearly. Layouts are said to be of two types with the following codenames-Armadillo- Shortcuts module and app drawer are absent whereas Quick Settings, Google Feed, and Recent Apps are present.

Capybara- This is a traditional desktop layout with a placeholder and a taskbar. The taskbar is somewhat similar to a start button.

2. Assistant-friendly

One thing is certain. Google Fuchsia OS is more Google Assistant-friendly than Android. The mobile app development company can utilize its features like apps drawer, camera use, and on-screen activity to enhance Google Assistant-based features.

We can expect that Fuchsia will go in more detail and enable to fetch more information than its traditional counterpart, Android OS. Such enhanced support can enhance the scope for more features and functionality.

3. Cross-device Support

This is one of the most important features from the perspective of mobile app development services. Today, we have a number of devices available across different platforms ranging from smartphones to wearables and laptops to tablets. Google Fuchsia OS is designed to work on any devices with the same user experience. Its cross-device support enables mobile app developers to build apps once and run them on multiple devices.

These days, companies want to address a huge audience across the world irrespective of devices and platforms. Now it is easy to hire mobile app developers to build an app for Fuchsia OS and enable the customers or app users to use the app through their Google accounts.

4. Customized Kernel

Fuchsia OS has its custom kernel, Zircon, which can be readily upgraded as and when necessary. Unlike Android and Chrome OS, Fuchsia OS enables developers to get access to the direct kernel. As a result, such apps can enhance the security of the device and remain compatible after a system upgrade.

It is fair to mention that developers will come up with a more powerful, cross-platform mobile app development solution with the help of Google Fuchsia OS.

Concluding Lines

Much-anticipated Fuchsia OS is still in the development phase at Google. It is not possible to give the exact date of its arrival at this point. We can only mention that Fuchsia OS will be a real thing with significant support of Google. You can feel the virtual existence of this OS in Google’s own repository and GitHub. The development team works on various aspects and deals with different issues every day for releasing futuristic Fuchsia OS.

We offer enterprise-grade mobile app development services globally. Our in-house team of experienced Android app developers can come up with the next-gen apps by integrating technological advancements of futuristic technologies like AI, AR, and IoT.

via Technology & Innovation Articles on Business 2 Community http://bit.ly/2TNdsJ6